How To Land A Promotion

I should preface this by saying there are no shortcuts when trying to get promoted. You absolutely cannot expect to put in half the effort and yield all of the desired results. In fact, in order to stand out from the crowd and make a name for yourself, often times you have to go above and beyond what is required of you within your normal day-to-day job description. So what exactly can you do to make the right impression and land that big promotion? The tips below can give you the guidance you need to find the success you’ve been hoping for.

 

Don’t say you want to be a leader; just be a leader.

Depending on your current role and the nature of your work, there are many different ways as to how to you can establish yourself as a true leader within your company. If you’re already in a managing role, going the extra mile to ensure quality of work will certainly help your chances for a promotion. Educate and reach out to those around you – be someone that other employees can go to over small issues or if they need a question answered. If you’re not in a position of management just yet, you can still apply both of these strategies as they will show that can handle the requirements of a role larger than the one you currently have.

 

Think of the team goals, and not of your own.

It can be difficult to not have a “me, me, me” mentality when thinking about your own goals. Thinking of what you want is not a bad thing, however, it can become a bad thing if it’s not applied to the greater good of the company’s overall goals. As stated in a Forbes article on the topic, “…it is impossible to do all the right things for all the wrong reasons.” You have to know how your strengths fit into the larger goal of the company. When approaching the subject of a promotion, position your pitch towards how you want to help the company succeed, and not what you personally deserve as a hard worker.

 

Be willing to ask for what you want, and show the proof as to why you deserve it.

Opportunities are sometimes hard to come by. If you’re in a particularly small or large company, you might have to create your own. This means that you both have to ask for a promotion, and you have to keep records at all times of what you consider your best work. You can’t always wait for your boss to notice your talents and recognize the projects you’ve had a hand in. And by gathering your top work and examples of leadership, you’ve done your boss’ job for them. This may seem like a scary and rather bold prospect, however, even if there are no opportunities available or your company doesn’t have the resources to carve out a new position to showcase you at that time, you’ve now established yourself as someone who wants a bigger piece of the pie. When the time comes, your boss will already have your portfolio on hand and the impression that you have what it takes to be a go-getter.

How to Lead Millennials

There are dozens of proven management strategies and techniques in practice in today’s corporate world. What managers are seeing now, however, is that those techniques may not be connecting with their new, young, millennial employees entering the workforce.

Millennials, the children of baby boomers, essentially, require more than employees of the past, because they’ve been given more than others in the past. With access to the internet possible since the time they were toddlers, they’ve discovered a whole world at a young age that those before them haven’t had access to. This has given them an edge in knowledge, but has also slightly stunted their ability to connect with management styles of the past.

If you are a leader in your business and are seeing a disconnect between you and your new employees, the techniques below will serve as a strong starting point in bridging the gap in your management strategy.

Work Must Have Meaning

Millennials have a need to connect with their work. If they don’t feel connected to the purpose of your business, they will simply go somewhere else. Even if your business doesn’t serve the public in a philanthropic way, having opportunities within the company in the form of charitable events and sponsorships will help to offer a connection.

Emphasize Training

No one likes to be thrown into the fire on day 1 when starting a new job. And while this must happen to a certain degree at some point, millennials are especially sensitive to this technique. Make sure they are well-equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to succeed within your business.

Showing Respect

Something that has given the millennial generation a slightly bad reputation is what some call a “sense of entitlement.” For millennials, what this translates to is, respect. Showing respect for the value they bring to the table is crucial – and, they do bring new skills to the table that should be respected – and will ensure that they show you respect as well.

Try A New Schedule

A new trend seen within many young companies started by millennials is the 4 day work week. Millennials value their time. After all, having been exposed to the power of the internet at such a young age, they know there is a whole world out there to see and it’s important that they see it. Giving your employees the option of working 4 10-hour days instead of a traditional 5 day work week will not only keep your young employees but can draw new employees in.

Do you have a favorite management style for millennials? If so, tweet them to me @PepperRutland on Twitter, or message me on LinkedIn!

Succeeding as a First-Time Manager

pepper rutland_managementManagement is a natural progression for anyone who loves his or her job and has a knack for leadership. However, great managers are not born or developed overnight; even with a world of experience, knowing how to bring out and/or nurture the same skills in others is something that takes time and personal development. Here are some tips to help you prepare for your first management role.

 

  1. Learn The Business
    There’s a major difference between knowing what the company does and how the company works. You may have some base-level knowledge of how things happen in the company, especially If you’re being promoted into a new role within the same organization, but as a manager, you must also consider the business side of things. That means, the company’s financials, procedures, bureaucracy and how your position, department and subordinates fit into that puzzle.
  2. Ask Questions
    Which brings us to our next major tip: ask questions. This is probably the best but most overlooked part of managing. After all, you’re expected to know everything, right? Wrong. Don’t be afraid to admit blind spots. They’re okay as long you’re making an effort to improve on them. This is particularly helpful for people transitioning to a new company altogether.
  3. Lead By Example
    People will look to you for guidance on how to respond to problems and how to react in times of uncertainty. Make sure you’re sending the right message to your team at all times, and creating a relationship in which they trust your choices and are willing to heed your advice and direction.
  4. Be Yourself
    Your management style or approach doesn’t have to be like someone else’s, nor should you wait for directives on how to get things done. If you have a good idea, take initiative, try things out, and learn whether it works or how you can do things better going forward. This is how you improve.
  5. Be Easy on Yourself
    This cannot be overstated. No one is perfect. In working to get there, show yourself mercy and allow room for mistakes. Doing anything for the first-time is not likely to be easy, but challenges are necessary. Balance the bad with the good, and when criticizing yourself, highlight both. You may find that you’re doing better than you think.

How To Find Your Leadership Style

head-1169901_960_720In another blog, I highlighted various qualities a leader should possess, including: proactivity, attentiveness, imagination, focus, and continued development. Each of these are important, as I’ve learned from my own experience, and I hope it provided valuable insight about what it takes to properly manage a company. However, while these qualities are necessary, it’s important to realize that all leaders are not the same.

 

In fact, there are at least five different styles of leadership, each of which has its place and is often contingent upon the leader’s personality and initial exposure to certain style. Still, learning the differences in each can help managers create a more definitive style and even learn to adapt when appropriate.

 

Different Styles

  1. Democratic
    As the name suggests, democratic leaders use the input from their teams to make decisions about processes and procedures. This type of leader makes an effort to ensure that everyone has a say and that each voice is heard. As a note, this type of leadership can be time consuming, especially if one has a large team. Nevertheless, it works well in places where change is expected or a normal part of the given process, in which a better or different way of doing things can be enhanced by new opinions.

  2. Autocratic
    Conversely, autocratic leadership creates the rules and makes decisions before bringing it to the team. These types of leaders tend to have more experience and a better understanding what is necessary to meet the end goal, thus giving the leader greater autonomy in making choices. This style is best when decisions must be made in a time crunch and when those on the team lack the understanding to make an informed decision on the subject at hand.

  3. Pacesetting
    These leaders set high expectations for their team members, desiring quick turnarounds on large projects. They are willing to put in the same effort and provide examples for, or even work alongside, the team. This level of leadership works when used sparingly and with skilled members of a team.

  4. Transactional
    This style of leadership, also called coercive or commanding, is most likened to a military style of management, in which the leader expects team members to simply do what they are told. This leadership style is said to be most common but least effective in maximizing productivity and/or creativity from team members.

 

As I said above, each of these styles has its place, and no one style is always best. Assess the characteristics of your team and your environment to determine when and how to employ these leadership roles. The best leader is perceptive, above all things.

4 Common Management Mistakes And How To Fix Them

man-people-space-desk-largePoor management skills can have a negative effect on an entire company. Employees who work under a bad manager will be unhappy and may leave the company. In fact, one out of two professionals surveyed for Gallup’s 2015 State of the American Manager Report stated that they have quit a job at some point in order to “get away” from their boss.

If a company has a strong leader, this can lead to a higher morale and more productive employees. It is important for a manager to create a positive working environment and to lead by example.

Here are four common mistakes that are examples of bad management, followed by solutions to these issues.

 

1) Failing to recognize employees’ strengths

Employees don’t feel valued when they are not recognized for their accomplishments. Some managers criticize their employees for their shortcomings and never praise them for what they are doing right. A September 2015 Achievers survey found that 57 percent of the 397 respondents did not feel recognized for their progress in the workplace. In order to be a good manager, let employees know that they are valued. Have consistent and open communication in which employees receive constructive feedback. A manager should help an employee to improve their weaknesses while celebrating each employee’s strengths.

2) Holding meetings that are not engaging or productive

Meetings are typically considered a hassle for the staff. Employees have to drop their projects and instead share information and opinions with others. This can scatter their focus and lead to a decrease in productivity. One way to fix this is to identify which employees need to attend a meeting and which ones can continue to work on tasks. Once you know who will be attending, brief these employees with a meeting schedule. This way, they can be better prepared and you can stay more on track. When the meeting gets off-topic, bring everyone back to the goal of the meeting. Ask for feedback at the end of the meeting.

 

3) Instilling fear in employees

Bad managers can threaten the job security of their employees. When employees are worried about getting laid off, their morale is reduced, decreasing the respect and trust that employees feel toward the manager. Some ways that managers instill fear include assigning blame, withholding information, and giving vague, noncommittal answers to questions. They create a persona that is unapproachable and they don’t show compassion. To avoid being this type of manager, create an environment centered on trust and honesty. Remain transparent by sharing pertinent company information with employees. Do not blame others. Instead, take responsibility, and transform failures into opportunities for growth.

 

4) Creating a negative working environment

The previously mentioned habits can lead to a negative working environment. Employees do not work as well when they are suffering from stress and anxiety. If there is a lack of managerial presence or if policies are inconsistent, the workplace can become filled with negatively. To keep these positive, be “present”, treat everyone fairly, and keep policies consistent. Show your employees that you view them as equals, regardless of their level. Also make sure employees are comfortable discussing what they aren’t satisfied with.

The way a manager behaves can make or break a company. Keeping a positive work environment is crucial to the success of a company. Make sure you are a great manager and that your employees are satisfied.