How to Lead Millennials

There are dozens of proven management strategies and techniques in practice in today’s corporate world. What managers are seeing now, however, is that those techniques may not be connecting with their new, young, millennial employees entering the workforce.

Millennials, the children of baby boomers, essentially, require more than employees of the past, because they’ve been given more than others in the past. With access to the internet possible since the time they were toddlers, they’ve discovered a whole world at a young age that those before them haven’t had access to. This has given them an edge in knowledge, but has also slightly stunted their ability to connect with management styles of the past.

If you are a leader in your business and are seeing a disconnect between you and your new employees, the techniques below will serve as a strong starting point in bridging the gap in your management strategy.

Work Must Have Meaning

Millennials have a need to connect with their work. If they don’t feel connected to the purpose of your business, they will simply go somewhere else. Even if your business doesn’t serve the public in a philanthropic way, having opportunities within the company in the form of charitable events and sponsorships will help to offer a connection.

Emphasize Training

No one likes to be thrown into the fire on day 1 when starting a new job. And while this must happen to a certain degree at some point, millennials are especially sensitive to this technique. Make sure they are well-equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to succeed within your business.

Showing Respect

Something that has given the millennial generation a slightly bad reputation is what some call a “sense of entitlement.” For millennials, what this translates to is, respect. Showing respect for the value they bring to the table is crucial – and, they do bring new skills to the table that should be respected – and will ensure that they show you respect as well.

Try A New Schedule

A new trend seen within many young companies started by millennials is the 4 day work week. Millennials value their time. After all, having been exposed to the power of the internet at such a young age, they know there is a whole world out there to see and it’s important that they see it. Giving your employees the option of working 4 10-hour days instead of a traditional 5 day work week will not only keep your young employees but can draw new employees in.

Do you have a favorite management style for millennials? If so, tweet them to me @PepperRutland on Twitter, or message me on LinkedIn!