4 Reasons Why People Love Where They Work

pexels-photo-57825-large

Last month I highlighted MMR’s inclusion in the Baton Rouge Business Report as one of the best places to work in the city. The decision was made based on a combination of MMR’s answers to a questionnaire about workplace policies and demographics, and our employees’ own details about their satisfaction within the company. I decided to write this blog to share a few tips about why employees may consider your company a great place to work.

Employees enjoy love where they work when:

  1. The Company Has a Clear Vision
    People want their work to have a purpose. Employees, at every level, want to be aware of the company’s objectives, its plans for future growth and how their own efforts fit into the larger picture. Obviously not every detail is appropriate to share, and certain pieces of information may be reserved for small groups within the company rather than the entire organization. When possible, however, make a point to communicate the company’s vision and when it reaches certain goals to which the people of the company have contributed.
  1. Their Voices Are Heard
    Many times, ideas for how your company can improve, whether in practice or the offering of your product, are right in house. Your employees are a great resource because they are capable, knowledgeable, and have a stake in your company being successful. Open door policies are great if you can do them; if you don’t have the time, be sure ti designate someone who can receive and share those comments and concerns with you, then respond personally to let your employees know you’re listening.
  1. They Are Valued
    In that same regard, employees want to feel like they mean something to the company. The truth is, they mean a lot to the company, regardless of their title. Everyone has a part to play which enables the rest of the team to focus on their own responsibilities. You show that you value your employees in many ways, such as: providing fair wages and great benefits, listening, celebrating success together, and offering opportunities to advance, as a start.
  2. They Like The Leadership
    Lastly, but not the least important, people love where they work when they like who they work for. As a leader, people look at how you interact with them and others in the company. They take stock of whether you exemplify strong, clear leadership and your response to situations under pressure. Each of these factors affects how they see you, and ultimately determines how they see the company. Be cognizant of that representation and treat everyone with the respect they deserve.

How To Find Your Leadership Style

head-1169901_960_720In another blog, I highlighted various qualities a leader should possess, including: proactivity, attentiveness, imagination, focus, and continued development. Each of these are important, as I’ve learned from my own experience, and I hope it provided valuable insight about what it takes to properly manage a company. However, while these qualities are necessary, it’s important to realize that all leaders are not the same.

 

In fact, there are at least five different styles of leadership, each of which has its place and is often contingent upon the leader’s personality and initial exposure to certain style. Still, learning the differences in each can help managers create a more definitive style and even learn to adapt when appropriate.

 

Different Styles

  1. Democratic
    As the name suggests, democratic leaders use the input from their teams to make decisions about processes and procedures. This type of leader makes an effort to ensure that everyone has a say and that each voice is heard. As a note, this type of leadership can be time consuming, especially if one has a large team. Nevertheless, it works well in places where change is expected or a normal part of the given process, in which a better or different way of doing things can be enhanced by new opinions.

  2. Autocratic
    Conversely, autocratic leadership creates the rules and makes decisions before bringing it to the team. These types of leaders tend to have more experience and a better understanding what is necessary to meet the end goal, thus giving the leader greater autonomy in making choices. This style is best when decisions must be made in a time crunch and when those on the team lack the understanding to make an informed decision on the subject at hand.

  3. Pacesetting
    These leaders set high expectations for their team members, desiring quick turnarounds on large projects. They are willing to put in the same effort and provide examples for, or even work alongside, the team. This level of leadership works when used sparingly and with skilled members of a team.

  4. Transactional
    This style of leadership, also called coercive or commanding, is most likened to a military style of management, in which the leader expects team members to simply do what they are told. This leadership style is said to be most common but least effective in maximizing productivity and/or creativity from team members.

 

As I said above, each of these styles has its place, and no one style is always best. Assess the characteristics of your team and your environment to determine when and how to employ these leadership roles. The best leader is perceptive, above all things.

4 Common Management Mistakes And How To Fix Them

man-people-space-desk-largePoor management skills can have a negative effect on an entire company. Employees who work under a bad manager will be unhappy and may leave the company. In fact, one out of two professionals surveyed for Gallup’s 2015 State of the American Manager Report stated that they have quit a job at some point in order to “get away” from their boss.

If a company has a strong leader, this can lead to a higher morale and more productive employees. It is important for a manager to create a positive working environment and to lead by example.

Here are four common mistakes that are examples of bad management, followed by solutions to these issues.

 

1) Failing to recognize employees’ strengths

Employees don’t feel valued when they are not recognized for their accomplishments. Some managers criticize their employees for their shortcomings and never praise them for what they are doing right. A September 2015 Achievers survey found that 57 percent of the 397 respondents did not feel recognized for their progress in the workplace. In order to be a good manager, let employees know that they are valued. Have consistent and open communication in which employees receive constructive feedback. A manager should help an employee to improve their weaknesses while celebrating each employee’s strengths.

2) Holding meetings that are not engaging or productive

Meetings are typically considered a hassle for the staff. Employees have to drop their projects and instead share information and opinions with others. This can scatter their focus and lead to a decrease in productivity. One way to fix this is to identify which employees need to attend a meeting and which ones can continue to work on tasks. Once you know who will be attending, brief these employees with a meeting schedule. This way, they can be better prepared and you can stay more on track. When the meeting gets off-topic, bring everyone back to the goal of the meeting. Ask for feedback at the end of the meeting.

 

3) Instilling fear in employees

Bad managers can threaten the job security of their employees. When employees are worried about getting laid off, their morale is reduced, decreasing the respect and trust that employees feel toward the manager. Some ways that managers instill fear include assigning blame, withholding information, and giving vague, noncommittal answers to questions. They create a persona that is unapproachable and they don’t show compassion. To avoid being this type of manager, create an environment centered on trust and honesty. Remain transparent by sharing pertinent company information with employees. Do not blame others. Instead, take responsibility, and transform failures into opportunities for growth.

 

4) Creating a negative working environment

The previously mentioned habits can lead to a negative working environment. Employees do not work as well when they are suffering from stress and anxiety. If there is a lack of managerial presence or if policies are inconsistent, the workplace can become filled with negatively. To keep these positive, be “present”, treat everyone fairly, and keep policies consistent. Show your employees that you view them as equals, regardless of their level. Also make sure employees are comfortable discussing what they aren’t satisfied with.

The way a manager behaves can make or break a company. Keeping a positive work environment is crucial to the success of a company. Make sure you are a great manager and that your employees are satisfied.